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-on in an environment where the market is at five-year highs, where fundamentals are great and not okay and where the federal reserve is absolutely not guaranteeing federal reserve action going for the next six or 12 months, you need to be very careful. you've got a drip open. look for dripping in, look for corrections and pullbacks, do it over time because this is classic investors mistake. five-year high, people open the paper and it's time to invest and they dump the money at the worst possible time. >> you think that we're due for a bit of the break after all the money having made into equities the last couple of months. i'm not looking for a 20% correction but it's inevitable when the market his 1306 on the dow, we'll have to see how earnings play out over the course of the next 30 days but there will be an opportunity to buy some songs at a cheaper price. >> the vent dealing will be the real driver of the market going down, right? >> we know mobile has been driving everything throughout technology. what do you want to hear out of the conference call and how they will capitalize? >> we want
down a little bit more during the course of 2013. but given the overall environment that we're in, the fact that securities are repricing at lower levels as we reinvest, the overall low rate of environment is not unusual. we do have offsets in our loan portfolio as our national strategic non-portfolio runs down or winds off. we have an opportunity to invest in higher yield customer oriented relationships, and so we think we've got some stabilizing forces. it's hard to tell exactly how the market reacted in one given day to our net interest margin. but we feel like we've had pretty good management of it and i'm optimistic we'll maintain some stability in a tough environment in 2013. >> your fee income did come in lower than expected, though, both capital markets and mortgage banking. is that just a one-time only? are we going to see a better series of numbers in 2013? >> well, yeah, capital markets is probably the big driver of any up or down movement in our fee income. the fourth quarter was an unusual quarter in a couple of ways. one, you had the impact of hurricane sandy where t
being eased up, a very good environment for lending, very solid for housing. i can see a lot more reasons to be positive than negative right now. >> if interest rates went up 100 basis points, you think housing would do as well? >> you think they will go up 100 basis points. >> my point is housing better do good at historically manipulated low rates. i don't see that it's bragging rights here. >> right, right. the minute interest rates going up, where is the blockbuster in housing building taking place, in the midwest or takingce in new york city, new york, the tri-metro area, boston, chicago, where is it taking place because housing in and around the new york metro area is not going off to the races? >> well, you're going to see it across the country. that seems to be what the surveys are showing. now, the latest survey of the national association of home builders suggested things were a little bit flat, but you're going to get rebuilding after hurricane sandy in the northeast, and there are bidding wars in places like phoenix and parts of florida that used to be soaking in exces
to difficult unlearn, toe to speak. >> in this regulatory environment, they have got, to rick. >> i agree, but i think it's going to be nasty every first friday of the month for a while longer. >> all right. >> certainly going to be a lot of volatility. >> thanks, guys. see you later, gentlemen. >> michael fax he's bilingual, no knew. >> try having to say bartiromo every day. a big pair of bank earnings. a preview of american, press and intel. >> let's start win tell, folks. 45 cents, looking $13.5 billion in revenue. that's not what is important. intel couldn't trade on last quarter's numbers. it trades on forward revenue guide as. that's where the problem might be, so they are looking for 14.5 billion in the fourth quarter. the question is what's the guidance going to be, and a lot of people are concerned it's going to be below the current quarter numbers so 12.5 to 13.5 billion a lot of people are looking at. at 12.5 billion or below there's a problem for intel. american express, unfortunately, not a lot of sussense. i think it was the 10th last week when they were standing here. pre-a
that if they really want to create value and send their stocks higher, the best way to do that in this environment may be simply to buy another company. hence, the huge spike in m and a activity in the fourth quarter. i think it's big. this trend continues in 2013, if you ask me. but i don't want just to see more deals. i want them to be the right deals. buy, buy, buy. so for all of the lonely is ceos who i'm sure are sitting on the rooftops singing. ♪ matchmaker make me a match ♪ find me a match make me a perfect match so you can sing, yes i am a rich man to a very plaintive tune. the hottest theme out there, a steaming hot thing, housing. these two combined, business will be an absolute powerhouse. i'm talking about masco and fortune brands home and security. two makers of cabinets, plumbing fixtures and other housing-related products. masco is the largest non commodity supplier to home depot and i should point out that any deal to acquire fortune brands would have to be done later in the year because of arcane tax laws. that's the caveat. still, the timing. we are now witnessing a fabulous hous
of capacity and given the macro environment, given the cannibalization that tablets are doing with the expensive notebooks and the road map that is questionable. >> is there a road map that you see that gets them into the tablet and mobile space in a better way? you look at what is happening to the stock of arm, look at the stock of qualcomm, and these guys are nowhere in the same arena. >> that's a good question. they have the road map to get in. will they have a position of dominance? being the same is not going to be enough, particularly given a lot of oems over many, many years being accustom to them being basically sole source or a dominant proprietary source when you have an alternative where you have a multi source solution, some suppliers that use their processing from a company called arm. so it's going to be very tough. you have to have significant advances for oems to use your product. i don't think they that. >> what does this say about hue yet pack yard? what does this say about the news about dell with a potential buyout? i assume what is happening at intel is ha
. >> all right. how do you want to allocate capital then, bruce? how are you investing in this environment? >> we think it's important not to be taking too little risk, so certainly making sure that you have adequate exposure, especially to things like the emerging markets where the fundamentals of growth are a lot better than they are in the united states is clearly important, but most of all making sure that you're taking in risk in line with what you can afford to take and not taking too much and not too little but really controlling it throughout the year. >> steve. is it possible that the beige report that we get today is sort of ancient history because things are becoming clearer now as far as the fiscal policy of the united states. we still have the debt crisis coming in a couple of months here to be resolved, but, you know, things do seem to be getting better. we've had some companies say that the housing market is for real right now, for example. >> yeah. i guess there's two different ways to think about it, bill. ancient history or crystal ball telling our future. i mean, when i
to be in this environment? what kind of year do you expect it to be? >> we don't have price on the dow, but we continue to look at more domestic-facing companies and industries, so consumer finance are big parts of both portfolios. we think housing continues to improve, consumer continues to delever, monetary policy remains supportive, so stock-pickers, we own redwood trust, which is a mortgage reit investment jumbo. we own carmax. they invented the used car superstore, lots of growth left there. and then a final stock would be ko colfax, which we do a great job as the vascular system for the global economy. they build large fluid systems for petrochemical companies, energy companies, as the economy comes in, as industrial production comes back, they're well positioned. so, we're pretty constructive on the asset class, particularly because a lot of people don't seem to be all that constructive on the asset class. >> steve sax, what about you? where are you seeing the flow? what are investors particularly grav stating towards these days? >> it's till equities and all of last year, credential the first c
to improved market environment. which shows a lot of promise if uncertainty is removed. take a listen. >> $90 billion is sitting there waiting to get into the market. if we see confidence coming through from the political sector, the global economic recovery, this thing has legs. >> guys, barring what they called a terrible quarter in commodities, a lot of things working in their favor. margin goals being met, all that. >> i want to talk about something that david faber said, came on air and said the different stories, there was a lot of chatter on the web, they said the company was in big trouble. you said they were dead wrong. i almost gave him credence on air. i apologized to mr. gorman about that. that was a very good call. you knew that there were rumor amongers that were spreading things that weren't true. >> we were in the mid stl of the european crisis, we're certainly not in the midst of the same crisis. any exposure you had to the sovereigns were seized on. morgan was suffering from that. that was a while back already. >> how did you know it was okay? >> how did i know? >> yeah, how
. they're trying to get a new stadium and they want public funding and this in tax environment, they say the only way to really enhance your value is to leverage this kind of victory if they won the super bowl to get a new stadium, and they're right on the cusp of it. they're having that conversation with it. and they're the only team left that haven't won it. and then you have ray lewis, who was, you know, charged with murder 12 years ago. >> right. >> and now he's like the beacon of respect in the nfl. >> it's -- for me it's hard to get past my preconceived notions. i don't think the ravens belong, i hate to say that, where, you know, i think they're going to have a hard time getting past new england. and i also think atlanta's going to have a hard time getting past san francisco, don't you? >> i think the san francisco, in many ways -- >> did you watch that? >> yeah. they are good. it's funny, they say colin kaepernick and rg three are transforming the game of football. at 180 plus yards rushing. how can you do that for ten years? >> and then i think new england's defense trying to st
that could be said. that being said, stocks that go to 90 will go to 120. a very bullish environment if we do sell off, i want you to buy, not sell. always a bull market somewhere, right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer. i will see you tomorrow. >>> >>> good evening, i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." yes, the stock market still bullish. i think that's great. i'm a bull too right now. but here's my challenge to everyone. instead of just a 2% economy, why can't we do so much better and get to a 4 or 5% growth economy? president obama has still not adopted progrowth policy. here's another thing. i'm not the only one who wants the president and congress to significantly cut spending. i mean, significantly. it would be progrowth and no more tax hikes by the way. spending and the debt are the top issue of concern for voters. look, these heinous mass murders are not about weapons. question -- why isn't anyone tackling the really tough issue that may be the root causes of these atrocities? such as broken families, such as the absence of fathers who set examples for their sons? such as
make this practical for us and our viewers. how do we make money in this environment? we know where we are, see what the reality is, may not be what you want but the fed is there, providing easy market and that's why this market wants to go nowhere but up except in equities. how do you make money in this market? >> the fed is pushing you into risk assets so that's where you go. you have to keep going while the band is playing, but this is what concerns me is at what point do we get the snap-back? we already started off 2012 with a record amount of money going into high yield. how would you like to buy c-paper and get 5.5% return on it as far as yield goes? >> i would hate to be a portfolio manager in this kind of environment because i don't know how you balance a portfolio in terms of risk. >> i would love to be one, and i think part of it is if you -- you can make money dmest click because stocks are still relatively valued or undervalued based on, you know, the fed's model and other models, a lot of opportunities to pick up stocks that were hit hard during the summer, industrial stoc
the feds for smaller buy back to go forward to play it safe in a regulatory environment. sue, back to you. >> thank you very much. matt, covering goldman sachs and j.p. morgan for wells fargo. matt, first of all, let's go to j.p. morgan. how do you rate the stock and do today's rates change the way you feel about the stock? >> thanks, sue. we have an outperform rating on j.p. morgan today and we've had it for some time. we think today's results actually were, once you read through a number of the one-time items, relatively strong. we see a core return on tangible common equity in mid teens. and we think that the strong mortgage performance of the company as well as the relatively strong performance out of investment bank, good revenue performance, and as your previous reporter mentioned, preconference as well and that leads it a solid performance. relative to the peer group for the next six to 12 months. >> so matt, give mae choice between goldman sachs and j.p. morgan. i know they have fundamental differences between them, but if you have to buy one stock today, would it be j.p. morgan o
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of the economic environment we've experienced in the last couple of years, exceptional product and a great customer experience, there's opportunity for share gain. we believe if we can see it on our terms in thaur environment, we're still going to win. >> it starts and ends with product. >> mickey really stirred the pot during the korns when he said it's unbelievable that amazon hasn't been mentioned. >> that's good. yeah. i guess jeff basel doesn't show up for these things, but he is one of the big elephants on the block, too. >> most definitely. and we know they're willing to take a loss sometimes just to gain that market share and it does seem to be worrying folks so much so that they're afraid to talk about it. >> were the abercrombie guys there? >> no. >> i want to get that guy there. >> you want to get him on the plane. you have to follow the rules, have to have the right uniform. >> what's the song they sing? >> phil collins. but a lot of other rules, too. >> you're not allowed to wear flip-flops. >> and they can only address them -- >> wear the same cologne, too. >> there has to be
at dollar stores, you hurt these stocks. the low-ends retail environment is more competitive. they have to become more promotional, code word for more discounts. in order to hold their own, they vo have to put real pressure on margins. the higher payroll taxes on consumers, it's very hard to make the case that dollar stores can be owned here. it's true companies have big long-term growth stories, and they have to expand store base around the country. that's not a reason to buy them as long as existing stores have so much trouble. at this point, dollar stores may be too cheap to go much lower, dollar tree sells 14 times earnings, and when their historical multipliers are higher, however, there is no catalyst that can get that multiple to expand. no catalyst to drive this stock higher, and that makes buying them frankly a big no-no. you said to me, jim, give me something in the space. you want something in the space? i say go with cramer fave five below. five for you home gamers. i've been a big fan of this company since it became public in july, and -- philadelphia based and if you got i
some time to work through the challenges of the current environment. just that alone is one of the statements in the press release on an earnings day if you say well, it's still going to take some time, there may be other shoes to drop. that's what i imagine is going to happen here. they say it's going to take time to realize their core earnings potential as well as improving returns on asset tangible equity, all of these are critical goals going forward. of course those are goals that they had yet to meet. >> that's the real quite there, down 76 cents. that is the kind of action we're seeing. it is, for this to trade higher today, i don't know. they can explain away as much as they want here but i don't know that, i think people are going to look at it -- and it would seem like you'd say well we didn't bring back as many reserves. then it begs the question, why didn't you bring the reserves back. >> conservative management or is it a situation where they have a much worse portfolio when it comes to the mortgage? those are questions that are going to be asked. there's a conf
efficient planes to deal with a higher priced oil environment when you can fill every seat have you and then some. boeing, the single greatest short of our lifetime, frankly, actually rallied 92 cents today. a bear's worst nightmare, which, of course, is there for the single best possible dream. for a bull. now, let's extrapolate the story. we were suppose supposed to have a horrendous, hideous economy. those guys real downers. why? washington gridlocked, confidence down, horrible down there. president, republicans, care less about the economy. supposed to be crushed, absolutely annihilated about worries of the upcoming debt ceiling and laid to waste by the end of the tax holiday. rich people stopped dead in their tracks by new tax hikes. one so steep we were supposed to switch to peanut butter and jelly sandwiches rather than dining at three-star restaurants. pass the skippy, keep the foie gras. we find out we had the highest housing starts since the boom, double where we were not that long ago, and the analysts were determined to tell you housing is about to go all tepid, numbers
the risk. >> you manage risk. that's what you have to do particularly in today's environment where there is a fair amount of risk. let me ask you before we get into this dwe bait. how are you managing risk right now? how are you allocating capital? >> we're global managers so we have a broad spectrum where we can go now. we think overseas is advantageous rather than being in the u.s. close to the highs. yet the economy is -- the real economy is trading somewhat off its highs. if you look at europe, for example, where the headlines have been negative. the news flow has been awful. performance has been awful as well. so the market in europe has more reflected the performance of the real economy than it has here in the u.s. the fed qe program, the safe haven of the u.s. has caused money to flow to this part of the world. i think that leaves the u.s. a little pricier and perhaps more of a risk. >> it takes courage to fight the fed, though, right? >> absolutely. but ultimately and jack said it, fundamentals do matter. i think the market will reflect those. >> i heard active management d
cliff was a friendly family discussion compared to this hatfield/mccoy environment that's unfolding with regard to spending. >> so you think this whole story is going to have some real heart-stopping moments for the markets? >> i think there will be huge consequences. recall that in the summer of 2011 the last time we faced this that the dow went down 1800 points in july and august. now, granted there were some other issues in europe that were a concern. but we could see some serious consequences as a result of these -- this inability to have a discussion on spending cuts. >> i know you're a bond specialist, but apple reducing their iphone orders and so forth. apple fell 3.5% today. $18 to 501. is this apple reduction in ipad orders, is this symbolic of an economy that's getting weaker? >> well, i think so. i think -- well, we have heard some people say that, yes, it's part apple. the company. but also, i think it is symbolic of just people not having enough certainty of what kind of money they will have in the future to spend on items such as what apple offers. >> at the same time,
&p are yielding more than the ten-year u.s. treasury, and that type of environment where dividends are going to grow 10% this year, that can be a good backdrop on stocks like ford that developed its dividend last week, lowe's on the home improvement side and dresser injuries and transindustries. >> with all due respect, jpmorgan out yesterday saying that maybe the dividend play is last year's play and maybe now is the time to get into riskier assets in equities because they feel like the economy is going to start to pick up. so you're sticking with the dividend play though? >> i am. for these two reasons. one, bill, the growth of dividends is the story. not the absolute yield. it's the growth in dividends and that can be names like qualcomm, apple, ford is my example. second. when investors look much like 1994 and 1999, when interest rates went higher, the ten-year treasury was yielding, was returning minus 3% for those two calendar years. people will come back to the stock market, but they will come back to the stock market in the safer yield and dividend-growing stories. that is why i thin
and economic story is saying this is not the kind of financial environment that leads to rapid growth. >> interesting. >> okay. >> you tied it in to dell and jpmorgan and everything else. excellent. larry, thank you. >> my pleasure. >> join us tomorrow. "squawk on the street" begins right now. >>> good wednesday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm melissa lee with carl quintanilla, and jim cramer and david faber at the new york stock exchange. stocks had a pretty nice day yesterday. the s&p closed at five-year highs. we are looking to the down decide this morning. the dow looking to lose about 62 at the open. the picture in europe, a couple of downgrades for gdp forecasts from both the german government and world bank. italy is down by 1.5%. road map this morning starts off with the banks and earnings. jpmorgan higher. goldman sachs at 18-month highs. >> japan airlines grounding their entire dreamliner fleet. >>> dell shares falling this morning after david faber reports that a deal could be announced within two weeks, but at a price of 13.50 or 14 a share, he's got the de
. one of the leaders of this market, banks. financials. can that last in this environment? >> i mean look banks have a long way that they fell and they've had a long pathway back to something circa 2006-2007. they sri lankan as a percentage of market gap in the s&p. they are no longer dominant. that's all for the best. we have a much more diversified market. we should. i wouldn't say that the banks need to lead this matter. they've done very well. >> who is going to lead the market? >> i think you'll have a market without leadership but that doesn't mean a market that doesn't go up. you have multiple sectors of strength. technology. be inning to see how amazon does. you have a global economy growing modestly. >> are you worry about apple? >> as a company? no. am i concerned about apple as a stock at 500, i will be glad if we talked less about apple. it's one company amongst many. anybody in silicon valley has to be worried about the fact that their franchise is of extremely short duration. >> boeing. this boeing story is creeping up, getting worse on a daily basis. would you get rid
are building on the money center banks. i actually feel the environment is still tough, maybe getting more friendlives can i ask you about the rally we've had generally? it's notable that goldman sachs has outperformed both the ac and citi with an 18% rise in the stock over the last month. today, of course, you downgraded goldman sachs in the light of that move. where are you on the sort of share price movement that is we might see in those three and oats moves forward? >> to see additional up side in a broker dealing, you have to see the economy get better. that could happen. i'm hoping it will happened. i'm just not sure if this is the time to put new money into goldman sachs, if we're sure not sure that will play its way out. it's just a matter of, how long does it take for the uncertainty to get out of the way, so companies can get back to making acquisitions. >> jeff, do people give you a hard time when you cut the ratings and yet boost the price targets? that gets made fun of a lot. >> yeah, we do get some for it. the price target increase, it's very form layically driven. what our p
struck a down beat note warning that the global environment would remain challenging. let's take a look at shares. they are trading up nearly 4% in trade in london, up better than 7% in the last seven days. what's interesting, too, this is a company that last year just in talking about chinese sales saw shares get walked. >> after a really big run. there was a lot built into expectation owes that. >> this time, investors seemed happy about beating the last time. >> meantime, the 2% drop for same-store sales for h&m showed total sales up 8% last month, outperforming stims estimates. >>> coming up, we'll take a closer look at burberry with. >> inny carlisle, joining out at so is 10:45 a.m. central european time. set your alarm clock. >> something even more important is going on. for all of those who like a strong pint of bitter, the british beermaker has announced that it is reducing the alcohol content in its ale because of rising costs and lower demand. apparently watered down beer allows the parent company, heineken, to pay a lower rate of duty. so they're going to reduce the alcohol c
in this interest rate environment has been a boom in the past couple of years. those are going to expire at some point. with interest rates where they are, it's difficult for the banks on margin. there's no question the banking system is much stronger, earning better and is has much higher capital and liquidity than it's had probably forever almost. >> you know, well, that's quite a statement because there's a lot of people who would still say banks shouldn't necessarily be turning around and handing capital back to shareholderses. would you agree that given the improvements we've made, it's time for them to be allowed to go forward? >> i think that the banks have accumulated so much capital and that they really don't have a good use for it in light of the lack of qualified loan demand. i'm not saying lack of loan demand because there's a lot of loan demand. but the credit standards are much higher and you don't have much to do with the capital. so you have to give it back if you don't need it. i'm talking about toous banks. it's not true around the world. the u.s. banks have very high capital r
and everything because that is the environment when the i.t. budgets are much flatter. so from that point, we were looking quite good so far as we get into the next year. >> and last question, what do you think this company will look like in calm of years time? it's been through so many transformations, changing business over the years. is this going to be a company that is still heavily focused on i.t. services as you divest some of the other parts of the business? what do you think this will actually look like in, say, 2015? >> clearly, you've been clearly focused on i.t. services, we had the demerger announcement last quarter and we are progressing very well. so as we exhibit this for the calendar or near or on that, we should be able to be done in terms of activity. which means if we're limited now, it will contain only the products and services in the geography. services are globally. it will focus more and more in terms of momentum as we identify with the life sciences, energy, natural resources, liquidities all in terms of fm services or retail and goods. and a deal supported by the pr
employment opportunity, you've got income growth and environment of very low interest rate is headache to policymaker in which i think the government here continue to have to fine tunemakers every now and then essentially because after they tighten one time, they quiet down the market, but i comes back again because the liquidity flows remain strong. so whether this is the measures toned all measures remains to be seen, i think if the interest rate remains low, we may see further tightening after a period of quiet. i suppose contemplation, i think. >> stick right there. we also want to take a look at what is happening over in india. we're seeing mixed pictures on inflation. headline inflation slowed to its lowest level in three years, in fact. that was up about 7.2% from a year earlier and well shy of expectations. some say the lower than expected wpi fueled the rate cut from india. does this mean 25 basis point rate cuts and more to come? >> well, there's firm pressure from the politicians on the central bankers to do so. the growth is still rather iffy. you've got inflation taking th
returns, what you're telling clients for the next three to five years? >> in this environment, we're actually asking our clients to think about three things. first we're going to have low interest rates for awhile. so they need to adjust their expected returns. so in a low interest rate environment we're going to have lower returns across all asset classes. second, we're telling our clients that as they think about the lower returns in the context of their portfolios, they also need to recognize that we are going to have volatility from incremental policy on a global basis. whether it's in the u.s., europe, japan or emerging market countries. we are expecting that policy, whether it's monetary policy adjustments, fiscal policy, it will all be incremental. and that will create market pressure because it won't be at a pace that the markets would like to see. so that will introduce volatility. and it's not something our clients should try to trace. they should look over the horizon and invest for the long run. >> looking at the long run, three to five-year term outlook if you look at
the question people ask is, can we see anything from the fourth quarter that will tell us what the environment in 2013 is like. i guess my answer to that would still be no. fiscal cliff issues, europe, the election, tropical storms, et cetera, and there's still no real clarity on what the business models, investment banking are going to look like as we head toward three. it's going to be much better numbers than a year ago. numbers are going to be slightly down versus the third quarter. and -- to my mind, there's still really nothing we'll be able to take away from the numbers in terms of -- >> which is frustrating because we're at a time when we are trying to re-evaluate what the model is going to be, what earnings will look like going forward. in your view, what is -- what is the investment case for these investment banks today? >> well, the investment case for an investment bank is that when they work very well, they are extremely capital -- if i advise a company and get a fee for ecm or m&a deal, it requires no capital, and i get a lot of money. that's very attractive. the second thing is
's the agenda. >> one what are the things you think you can do in this environment? by the way, i talked to bankers who say, you know what, i don't know if anyone's going to trust us. first of all i'm not sure anyone did historically trusted banks. >> agreed. >> and that it may never get that much better until, frankly, the economy gets better and the unemployment picture gets better. >> i would sake exception with never. i think there have been times in the past when the banker was your friend. you knew you could go down and get a loan if you needed to buy a house. you didn't worry about whether you could qualify. you worried about, you know, what house you wanted to buy. those are the types we need to get back. to frankly, banking's only one part of the financial services industry. this is a very broad, very wide industry. markets are driven based on people's confidence in their future, their willingness to invest in something they think has a better future than the current times. so earning that confidence. you know, financial advisers in our industry, professionals who work with indi
is going to keep giving or taking. the environment we live in is still conducive to be la tij jous because no one can make any money. carl, back to you. >> rick, we'll talk to you in a bit. rick santelli. >>> goldman is making waves with its bonus payouts. mary thompson has a flash. >> the company confirming that goldman has decided not to delay the bonus payments until april which would have allowed the bonuses to be taxed at a lower rate. goldman sachs' stock is slightly higher, about three-quarters of a percent. those payments originally due here in the u.s. in 2013 but the company, again, accelerated those payments into 2012 to take advantage of lower tax rates. again, the uk says -- someone close to the company saying that after some consideration, it will not be delaying bonus payments there to take advantage of lower rates. back to you. >> yeah, not the only bank where compensation is in the news. thank you, mary. >>> a few minutes left in europe's trading days. simon hobbs in less than 60 seconds. and i jumped right on it. tdd# 1-800-345-2550 tdd# 1-800-345-2550 since i've switched
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)